'66 XLCH frame de rake

Classic short-frame models

'66 XLCH frame de rake

Postby psychwarlord » Fri Sep 18, 2020 4:58 pm

Hi all,

I am currently working on this '66 frame. I has been raked to about 37-38 degrees. Look although it was cut/wedged and re welded as you can see in the following pics. Has anyone on here had the joy of going through this same procedure?

I plan to set it up in a friends frame jig. Recut the same line that was cut before, then slowly remove material till we get the desired 30degree.

If anyone has any input or experience on this topic, i'm all ears.

Thanks,
James
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psychwarlord
 
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Re: '66 XLCH frame de rake

Postby riverdog » Sat Sep 19, 2020 8:38 pm

Can you put up a pic of the underside of the neck? might be some clues under there as to where the cutting started

Bob
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Re: '66 XLCH frame de rake

Postby No side stand » Tue Sep 22, 2020 4:21 am

The original cut was made from the bottom up to the small web behind the neck. They left a small section of the web for it to hinge and the standard procedure is to heat it and bend it out. Before doing any de raking, remove both bearing cups and place a straight edge on each surface (top and bottom) where the bearing cup sits. Measure between the straight edges near the casting, and then take a measurement out at the end of your straight edge (at least one foot away, or longer for more accuracy). If there is any difference in the measurement, it will need to be addressed during the heating stage of de raking.
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Re: '66 XLCH frame de rake

Postby psychwarlord » Thu Sep 24, 2020 4:46 am

No side stand wrote:The original cut was made from the bottom up to the small web behind the neck. They left a small section of the web for it to hinge and the standard procedure is to heat it and bend it out. Before doing any de raking, remove both bearing cups and place a straight edge on each surface (top and bottom) where the bearing cup sits. Measure between the straight edges near the casting, and then take a measurement out at the end of your straight edge (at least one foot away, or longer for more accuracy). If there is any difference in the measurement, it will need to be addressed during the heating stage of de raking.


Hi, Thanks. Whats the reason for this measurement? shrinkage or twisting under heat?
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Re: '66 XLCH frame de rake

Postby No side stand » Thu Sep 24, 2020 6:21 am

Whats the reason for this measurement? shrinkage or twisting under heat?

Yes. It is very common for raked or de raked necks to have bearing cups not in alignment.
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Re: '66 XLCH frame de rake

Postby psychwarlord » Sun Sep 27, 2020 9:39 pm

No side stand wrote:Whats the reason for this measurement? shrinkage or twisting under heat?

Yes. It is very common for raked or de raked necks to have bearing cups not in alignment.


Ok got it. Thanks for that bit of knowledge. The other thought I had is if I could get my hands on an uncut neck casting or a wrecked frame with a good neck casting then i could cut and slug the tubes? I spoke to a few guys i know that have alot of experience building frames. They weren't overly keen on the idea of welding the casting again.
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Re: '66 XLCH frame de rake

Postby No side stand » Mon Sep 28, 2020 2:47 am

The neck is only mild steel or just below C3 in AU - NZ, or around 320-350 grade. It is an easy weld with mild steel rods.
The skill will be in keeping the neck in the center line of the frame, and keeping the bearing cups faces in alignment with each other.
A reasonable boilermaker, or metal worker, armed with the above information should be able to put multiple tack welds along the weld area to reduce contraction, and then stagger the welds. Then it would be down to some skilled grinding, some linishing, and then some aggressive blasting to bring the texture back to the whole neck. Post more pics when you finish the project... whether it be de-rake, or new neck.
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Re: '66 XLCH frame de rake

Postby JerrryR » Mon Sep 28, 2020 9:30 am

Replacing the neck casting could be an option. There is a a tutorial at the Technical section at this site under the How To tab.
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Re: '66 XLCH frame de rake

Postby psychwarlord » Mon Sep 28, 2020 7:59 pm

No side stand wrote:The neck is only mild steel or just below C3 in AU - NZ, or around 320-350 grade. It is an easy weld with mild steel rods.
The skill will be in keeping the neck in the center line of the frame, and keeping the bearing cups faces in alignment with each other.
A reasonable boilermaker, or metal worker, armed with the above information should be able to put multiple tack welds along the weld area to reduce contraction, and then stagger the welds. Then it would be down to some skilled grinding, some linishing, and then some aggressive blasting to bring the texture back to the whole neck. Post more pics when you finish the project... whether it be de-rake, or new neck.


Will do. Thanks for your input.
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Re: '66 XLCH frame de rake

Postby psychwarlord » Mon Sep 28, 2020 8:02 pm

JerrryR wrote:Replacing the neck casting could be an option. There is a a tutorial at the Technical section at this site under the How To tab.


Yeah i have seen that. Only problem is I live in New Zealand and there is very little parts for these bikes. So everything has to come frame the states. I i could get my hands on a good neck casting for the right price I would consider it.
At this stage it looks like i will cut and re weld the neck. Just waiting for a friends frame jig to be available.

Thanks,
James
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